Tips for Models



When you decide you are going to be a model you will have lots of questions that need answers. I hope you will find answers to some of your questions in this posting.

Great Modeling Resources that you should take the time to view and read:



Web Sites:

Books:



A must read for someone who wants to be a model. The Professionals Guide to Modeling by Roger Talley.

You can buy it here on Amazon.com



What You Need To Know About Preparing For A Photo Shoot

Most professional models know by experience about what needs to be done before a photo shoot.



If you do not have a lot of modeling experience I suggest you look over the following list of things that will help you for this shoot and in the future. The more of these guidelines you follow the better your shots will turn out.

1. 72 hours before your photo shoot, avoid the following items (these items can give you oily skin and swelling):



  • a. Red meat
  • b. Alcohol
  • c. Caffeine
  • d. Spicy foods
  • e. Retin A and Alpha Hydroxy creams (causes skin peeling that will show with photo makeup)

2. Drink lots of water, carry it with you everywhere you go, and keep sipping.

3. Exfoliate your skin at least once a week and also the morning of the shoot. A good reasonably priced choice for a exfoliater is St. Ives Apricot Scrub which can be found at your Drug Store.

4. Have your brows professionally shaped and then keep them up by plucking the strays every few days. I will pluck strays the day of the shoot but probably will not have time to shape your brows. If you get your brows waxed, do it a few days before your shoot. NOT THE DAY OF your shoot! The reason for this is that it is next to imposible to cover the leftover wax with makeup so best to do it a few days before!

5. It is a good idea to carry your own mascara to the shoot with you. Some make-up artists use mascara with the same wand on several people. This can spread infection very quickly. Unless you know the artist and know that she only uses disposable wands, it’s best not to take your chances. I do use disposable wands!



6. Dark roots will look even worse in photos. Refresh your hair color a few days before your shoot. If you do not color your hair, try “shades” or a toner just a shade lighter then your hair to make it shine. If you need a trim, do it before the shoot.

7. Fingernails and toenails should be one length, well manicured, and the polish should be colorless or French, unless this shoot calls for color.

8. All traces of makeup should be gone from your skin. All eyeliner and mascara should be gone. Your face should be clean and product free when you arrive.

9. Do not over condition your hair before a shoot. Do use your regular styling products to make your hair behave, as chances are the hair stylist will not be wetting your hair and not be able to use gels, etc. Your hair must be dry before you arrive at the shoot.



10. Avoid dry lips by putting Vaseline on your lips before bed and the morning of your shoot. Exfoliate your lips by brushing them when you brush your teeth.

11. For body (lots of skin showing) shots, be sure you get rid of tan lines by visiting a tanning booth a few times.

12. Don’t do the spray on tan, it looks orange in photos and it looks streaky 90% of the time. Spray on tans have ruined shoots for everyone involved.

13. If you have facial hair and you are a woman you need to have it waxed before the shoot. Peach fuzz will show up on your skin, in fact it will look worse in photos then it does in person. People get used to it, you may have it and not be aware until the photos come back.



14. Get rid of body hair. Anywhere and EVERYWHERE it could possibly show.

15. Bring strapless bras, nude undergarments and a tube top usually comes in handy.

16. Wear loose comfortable clothing to the shoot, clothes that bind will leave marks.

If you are paying the artist, feel free to give advice on how you want to look. The photos are yours and you will have to live with them. If it is a test shoot, editorial, commercial shoot or a shoot that someone else is paying for it’s best to keep quiet on makeup and hair. Chances are the artist knows what the photographer and art director want. It may not be what you prefer but normally the person paying for the shoot likes to make ALL the decisions. If you are new at modeling it is a good idea to go ahead and let the artist make the decisions, even if you are paying her or him. In most cases they will know what will look better in the photos – they are dealing with lights, backgrounds and lens filters that you probably are not familiar with. Telling an artist or stylist how to do their job or how you like your makeup is the quickest way to insure you won’t work much.



Once you are on the job here are some industry etiquette tips

1. Do not chat or answer your cell phone unless it’s an emergency.

2. Do not eat or drink while in the Makeup/Hair chair

3. Don’t smoke or take smoke breaks, wait until the job is done and never smoke in wardrobe provided for you.



4. Be 15 minutes early to every job, heavy traffic is never an excuse for being late….you need to assume heavy traffic.

5. Don’t comment on the clothing, hair or makeup you are in, these are decisions out of your hands for a reason.

6. Never bring anyone to a job, this is very unprofessional and there is rarely room to accommodate more people on a shoot.

7. If you are asked to bring wardrobe, bring more than you are asked to bring, clients change their minds so bring lots of choices.

8. Never touch your makeup or hair, do not adjust your clothing, these are things the stylist and artist will do for you, that’s why we are here.

What clothing models should bring to commercial photo shoots

Good commercial models have invested in a commercial wardrobe. Models are often requested to bring a wardrobe to the shoot. This is especially true of stock shoots. I have made lists of wardrobe items most stylists would like to see you bring.

Women:
a few business suits
a little black dress
a few skirts (Current style is best, not too short.)
scarves and accessories (Cheap costume jewelry is fine—the more the better. )
nice black slacks and tan pants
5 or 6 tops (Colors are fine, but no black, no crazy colors or prints, and no logos.)
a turtleneck
jeans (no holes, not too worn-looking)
black and tan low-heeled shoes
tennis shoes without prominent logos (obvious branding)
black high heels (not too stripper-looking)
sandals
shorts (not too short)
ball cap with no logo
strapless bra, nude
nude undergarments
tube top
socks
a one-piece bathing suit and a two-piece if you have the figure for it
a jean jacket
a blazer, current style
push-up bra and cutlets if you are small on top

Men:

a nice suit (not cheap—This is a good investment in your career.)
jeans (not too worn-looking)
black shoes
tan shoes
tennis shoes (no obvious branding)
socks—black, tan, and white
dress shirts for suits (4 or 5 in different colors)
2 or 3 ties to coordinate with shirts
polo-style shirts (3 or 4 in different colors)
Dockers-type pants in navy and khaki
belts (dress and casual)
swim shorts
shorts, cargo in tan or khaki and one dark color
T-shirts (white, black, a few colors, no logos)
dress slacks, dark and light (no white)
turtleneck
pullover sweaters in a few colors
dress and sports watches
ball cap with no logo

My biggest pet peeves are worn-looking clothing. Take clothes to the dry cleaner to avoid fading and wrinkled clothing. I like to see models arrive with clothing on hangers in a garment bag. Take care in packing your clothes. Nothing is worse than a model coming to a shoot with a bag full of wrinkled clothes!
Obvious branding should be avoided on all clothing. If you can recognize a brand, we probably cannot use it on the shoot. Small logos on polo-style shirts normally will not show up, but anything larger may.
Many thanks to Mary Erickson for writing this wonderful article and sharing it with all of us!

Modeling Makeup Kit

Author:

 

A makeup kit is an important part of any model’s equipment.

You should have your modeling makeup kit with you for any photo shoot or job that you do – even if you know that a make-up artist has been scheduled for the assignment.

For Women

Cleanser

Toner (astringent for the oily skin and freshener for the normal to dry)

Moisturizer

Liquid Foundation or powder based foundation that can be applied dry or with a sponge

Contouring and highlighting powders or cream sticks

Concealer in natural tones (not white)

Loose transparent face powder

Liquid eyeliner black or brown

Brown eye pencil

Eyebrow pencil

Pencil sharpener

Lip pencil (nude or skin color)

Lipsticks and lip pencils to match eye and cheek selections

Eye shadows (brown-beige palette)

Eye shimmer pale beige

Mascara

Blush

Brushes (2-3 for the face)

Eye Drops (Visine – Also helpful for zits – it does “get the red out”)

Eye Make-Up Remover

Cotton Balls or rounds and cotton swabs

Travel size nail kit (including cuticle cream, hand lotion, nail buffer, base and top coat, cuticle clippers, orange stick emery board, three neutral nail colors, a clear red and an off-white for French tipping

Eye cream, eye gel for puffiness and body lotion

Toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss

– See more at:

Modeling Makeup Kit

Author:

 

A makeup kit is an important part of any model’s equipment.

You should have your modeling makeup kit with you for any photo shoot or job that you do – even if you know that a make-up artist has been scheduled for the assignment.

For Women

Cleanser

Toner (astringent for the oily skin and freshener for the normal to dry)

Moisturizer

Liquid Foundation or powder based foundation that can be applied dry or with a sponge

Contouring and highlighting powders or cream sticks

Concealer in natural tones (not white)

Loose transparent face powder

Liquid eyeliner black or brown

Brown eye pencil

Eyebrow pencil

Pencil sharpener

Lip pencil (nude or skin color)

Lipsticks and lip pencils to match eye and cheek selections

Eye shadows (brown-beige palette)

Eye shimmer pale beige

Mascara

Blush

Brushes (2-3 for the face)

Eye Drops (Visine – Also helpful for zits – it does “get the red out”)

Eye Make-Up Remover

Cotton Balls or rounds and cotton swabs

Travel size nail kit (including cuticle cream, hand lotion, nail buffer, base and top coat, cuticle clippers, orange stick emery board, three neutral nail colors, a clear red and an off-white for French tipping

Eye cream, eye gel for puffiness and body lotion

Toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss

– See more at:

For you models who are not lucky enough to have a makeup artist at your events and are building a basic makeup kit here is a list of suggested things your should have in your kit:
Modeling Makeup Kit
Author: Joe Edelman

A makeup kit is an important part of any model’s equipment.

You should have your modeling makeup kit with you for any photo shoot or job that you do – even if you know that a make-up artist has been scheduled for the assignment.
For Women

Cleanser

Toner (astringent for the oily skin and freshener for the normal to dry)

Moisturizer

Liquid Foundation or powder based foundation that can be applied dry or with a sponge

Contouring and highlighting powders or cream sticks

Concealer in natural tones (not white)

Loose transparent face powder

Liquid eyeliner black or brown

Brown eye pencil

Eyebrow pencil

Pencil sharpener

Lip pencil (nude or skin color)

Lipsticks and lip pencils to match eye and cheek selections

Eye shadows (brown-beige palette)

Eye shimmer pale beige

Mascara

Blush

Brushes (2-3 for the face)

Eye Drops (Visine – Also helpful for zits – it does “get the red out”)

Eye Make-Up Remover

Cotton Balls or rounds and cotton swabs

Travel size nail kit (including cuticle cream, hand lotion, nail buffer, base and top coat, cuticle clippers, orange stick emery board, three neutral nail colors, a clear red and an off-white for French tipping

Eye cream, eye gel for puffiness and body lotion

Toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss

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